Articles Tagged: patent

To reschedule or to unschedule cannabis

June 23rd, 2011 | By Pirate

On our show today we are going to be having Jason Kamiri from Iowa who is in favor of rescheduling cannabis. I have recently been in favor of rescheduling cannabis as well in order to give it some legal legitimacy as medicine, since Schedule I does not offer that legitimacy.

Interview with Jason Karimi about rescheduling cannabis  To reschedule or to unschedule cannabis

The question is; Do we reschedule or to unschedule cannabis?

Jason’s website is:  http://weedpress.wordpress.com

While I agree that cannabis is medicine and should have the notion made that it is considered medicine. I have changed my mind of working any further on cannabis rescheduling.
The biggest issue is being able to fight the federal government on the topic that Schedule I says that there is no accepted medical use of cannabis in the USA.

However Oregon took care of that last year by rescheduling cannabis to Schedule II.

I am very happy that Oregon took that step and won. Because now Schedule I is federally unqualified for cannabis, since cannabis does have accepted medical benefit in a very legitimate forum in Oregon via the scheduling of cannabis in Oregon under schedule II.  Now the feds can’t legitimately claim there is no accepted medical benefits in the USA any more.  Not only by that step in Oregon, but also in regards to 15 states having legalized cannabis for medical use, and the fact that the USA government has a patent on cannabis for it medical benefits.

The problems that I have with rescheduling cannabis is that in any other schedule than schedule I, big pharma gets control of the market.  Just like any other drug in Schedules II-V, Big Pharma controls and messes with that medicine however they see fit.

It also doesn’t offer much protection to consumers under Schedules II-V, because people still go to jail for these “legal drugs” for one thing or another.  Re-scheduling cannabis is not liberating cannabis. It is merely giving it a “medical qualification” and invalidating the claim that cannabis should be classified as schedule I.

While I disagree with Schedule I, I also disagree that big pharma should get control of this crop, because if they do, they will get their billions of dollars behind prohibition, and that can’t be good for anyone but big pharma.

Below is some of the issues that have taken place in Oregon.  Despite that cannabis has been rescheduled in Oregon, their dispensaries are getting shut down and patients are still getting arrested.

Rescheduling has not liberated Oregon from my point of view.

Which is why I believe it’s necessary to go back to May 18th 1969 when Timothy Leary challenged the constitutionality of cannabis prohibition and won.

Some clips from Oregon news on cannabis rescheduling:


Oregon Senate Bill 728 passed the Senate by a vote of 26-2, the House passed it 58-1, and the Senate concurred on amendments 26-3.  It now awaits Gov. Kulongoski’s signature.  The measure adds new sections to Oregon’s law on controlled substances:

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Portland — The Oregon State Board of Pharmacy acted today to remove marijuana from the list of “Schedule I Controlled Substances,” in accordance with a bill the legislature passed last year.

The new law, ORS 475.059 established by Senate Bill 728, requires marijuana’s removal from a list of controlled substances that have a “high abuse potential and no acceptable medical use in the United States.”

The Board placed marijuana into “Schedule II Controlled Substances,” which contains substances that have a “high abuse potential with severe psychological or physical dependence liability,” but are accepted for medical use in the US and are available by prescription. The Oregon Controlled Substances Act provides three additional schedules for substances that are progressively less serious or dangerous, Schedules III, IV and V.

The Board reviewed scientific and medical literature and heard testimony from experts and members of the public before voting to move marijuana into Schedule II. This action is consistent with Oregon’s assertion that marijuana does have an acceptable medical use.

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Portland — The Oregon State Board of Pharmacy acted today to remove marijuana from the list of “Schedule I Controlled Substances,” in accordance with a bill the legislature passed last year. The new law, ORS 475.059 established by Senate Bill 728, requires marijuana’s removal from a list of controlled substances that have a “high abuse potential and no acceptable medical use in the United States.” The Board placed marijuana into “Schedule II Controlled Substances,” which contains substances that have a “high abuse potential with severe psychological or physical dependence liability,” but are accepted for medical use in the US and are available by prescription. The Oregon Controlled Substances Act provides three additional schedules for substances that are progressively less serious or dangerous, Schedules III, IV and V. The Board reviewed scientific and medical literature and heard testimony from experts and members of the public before voting to move marijuana into Schedule II. This action is consistent with Oregon’s assertion that marijuana does have an acceptable medical use.

Senate Bill 728

http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measures/sb0700.dir/sb0728.en.html

 

http://stash.norml.org/wake-n-bake-lounge-raided-after-nearly-seven-months-of-openly-operating-in-aloha-4

On Wednesday June 16, 2011, officers in Washington County served search warrants on Wake n Bake Lounge, located at 18918 Shaw St in Aloha, Oregon.  Three residences associated with the cannabis club were also searched.  Although computers, various equipment and cannabis were confiscated during the execution of the warrant for suspected “manufacturing and distribution of a controlled substance,” no arrests were made.

How will this affect pot in Oregon? And what does this mean?

“A schedule I drug means that it has no medicinal value that is recognized,” said Lane County Chief Deputy District Attorney Patty Perlow. “A schedule II drug has recognized medicinal value but a high risk of abuse.
http://www.kval.com/news/local/96612724.html