Articles Tagged: legitimacy

Marijuana enters the medical dispensing industry with a strong presence MDBX

April 23rd, 2013 | By Pirate

Since 2010 a little known company called MedBox Inc has entered the medical dispensing industry, and has just in the last few days MedBox Inc filed its Form 10 to become a fully reporting public company with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  This is big news and also acted as a catalyst in the company’s stock price increase in the OTC market from about $20 to over $27 overnight.

The company’s approach is not new to medical dispensing.  In fact there are many companies that have been in to automated medical dispensing for a long time.

But what is difference about MedBox Inc is that not only are they entering the medical marijuana market with a strong presence, but MedBox Inc is also competing with some other very strong companies that are in the pharmacy automation industry for hospitals, long term care facilities, as well as jails and prisons.

On one hand I am excited to see some legitimacy in the market, and on the other hand I am disappointed by MedBox suing it’s competitors making MedBox Inc a company that I will likely not be investing in.

If money is the driving factor, rather than helping people in need.  Then you can consider me out.

More information on this topic at:

 

Twenty six year old man gets 57 months in prison for a schedule II drug

July 12th, 2011 | By Pirate

The debate regarding the future of cannabis as we know it started last year when Oregon rescheduled cannabis as a schedule II drug.

“A schedule I drug means that it has no medicinal value that is recognized,” said Lane County Chief Deputy District Attorney Patty Perlow. “A schedule II drug has recognized medicinal value but a high risk of abuse.”  http://www.kval.com/news/local/96612724.html

The future of cannabis now is moving towards a federal reclassification of cannabis.
There are several petitions on the state level to “reschedule cannabis“, which indicates no class just a “rescheduling”.
Rescheduling means most likely the same thing that happened in Oregon when they called for rescheduling in 2010 via Oregon Senate Bill 728

Shortly after this decision, the very first dispensary raid in Oregon took place despite the legitimacy of cannabis being medicine in Oregon law and by the board of pharmacy.
RE:  http://stash.norml.org/wake-n-bake-lounge-raided-after-nearly-seven-months-of-openly-operating-in-aloha-4

What is obvious in the medicalization of cannabis for example in California which is known as the first state for legal medical marijuana via Proposition 215, is that cannabis has not only become more difficult to obtain as prices have increased extraordinarily, and the enforcement of prohibition has stepped up a notch as can be seen by comparing 1990 arrest deomographics for cannabis in California to the 2008 demographics for cannabis arrests in California.  There was a 3 fold increase in that short of time.
In 1990 there were 20,000 arrests for cannabis possession, and in 2008 there were over 60,000 arrests for cannabis possession;  RE:  http://xcannabis.com/2011/05/how-are-medical-laws-protecting-patients/

With the increased prices, and the increased arrests California is evidence that the medicalization of cannabis is not helping to protect patients.

In years passed I have taken the initiative to go out and publicly protest the arrests of legitimate patients who are complying with state law.   RE:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUgcvTZrXWA

Despite state law, and despite the legitimacy of these patient’s asserting their rights, thousands of patients are still going to prison.

This is not just found with medical marijuana patients.  This is also happening with other drugs like Oxycontin which is a Schedule II drug.  I was in jail for cannabis at age 19, and I was in jail with someone who was arrested for illegally handling Oxycontin.  That was over a dozen years ago.  But I looked up “jail for oxycontin” in google and I found other troubling prison sentences even though this is a Schedule II drug

  • This man got 57 months in prison:

Donald J. Prescott, 26, of North Augusta, was sentenced today in federal court to 57 months in prison for attempting to possess with intent to distribute OxyContin.

In March 2010, Prescott bought placebo OxyContin tablets from a government informant, then expressed interest in selling up to 500 additional pills. This transaction was monitored by local law enforcement agents, and Prescott was taken into custody.
http://www.aikenstandard.com/2011local/0317-oxycontin-brief

 

  • Here is another case of a man getting 12 years in prison for Oxycontin.

http://www.salemnews.com/local/x1150796977/Peabody-man-sentenced-to-12-years-in-jail-in-OxyContin-case
Im only comparing Oxycontin to Cannabis, because Oregon rescheduled cannabis in the same class as Oxycontin, which is Schedule II.   Recently Washington State board of pharmacy received a petition for the same thing, and in this petition Schedule II was requested.

My point is, that if cannabis gets scheduled as a schedule II, it will only be more of the same and similar to current prohibition if not worse.

1.  Access to cannabis will not increase.  Cannabis is already widely distributed in this county and is ranked as the USA’s largest cash crop; http://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=2735017&page=1

2.  Prices of cannabis will not decrease, as going to a doctor, and a pharmacy will be required to get cannabis legitimately, and that is a significant cost, and the alternative is going to the black market, which cost no less than drugs in the pharmacy.

3.  People will still be going to jail for cannabis under rescheduling

What I see as the safest access, the best prices and the most protection under the law is to UN-schedule cannabis as Ron Paul and Barney Frank are calling for with H.R. 2306.  This will open up the free market, will lower prices and increase access as well as protect patients and other consumers from arrest.

I can compare this to already legal medicine that you can buy in an herb store like echinacea, or ginger, or St. Johns wort, etc..  These are legal medicines with essentially the same risks as cannabis, that are sold without restriction, in a free and open market.

 

We are at a cross roads right now.   We can ether call for rescheduling which.

1.  Gives the market exclusively to big pharma and licensed pharmacists

2.  Gets the backing of Big Pharma’s money behind prohibition

3.  Restricts cannabis to a small few

4.  Does nothing for industrial hemp cultivation in the USA

 

Or we can call for Un-scheduling which.

 

1.  Liberates cannabis

2.  Opens up the free market

3.  Gives patients and consumers the safest access possible

4.  Allows everyone to benefit and participate in the cannabis industry

5.  Legalizes Industrial hemp

 

The choice is clear to me.  I won’t be asking for “rescheduling”.

To reschedule or to unschedule cannabis

June 23rd, 2011 | By Pirate

On our show today we are going to be having Jason Kamiri from Iowa who is in favor of rescheduling cannabis. I have recently been in favor of rescheduling cannabis as well in order to give it some legal legitimacy as medicine, since Schedule I does not offer that legitimacy.

Interview with Jason Karimi about rescheduling cannabis  To reschedule or to unschedule cannabis

The question is; Do we reschedule or to unschedule cannabis?

Jason’s website is:  http://weedpress.wordpress.com

While I agree that cannabis is medicine and should have the notion made that it is considered medicine. I have changed my mind of working any further on cannabis rescheduling.
The biggest issue is being able to fight the federal government on the topic that Schedule I says that there is no accepted medical use of cannabis in the USA.

However Oregon took care of that last year by rescheduling cannabis to Schedule II.

I am very happy that Oregon took that step and won. Because now Schedule I is federally unqualified for cannabis, since cannabis does have accepted medical benefit in a very legitimate forum in Oregon via the scheduling of cannabis in Oregon under schedule II.  Now the feds can’t legitimately claim there is no accepted medical benefits in the USA any more.  Not only by that step in Oregon, but also in regards to 15 states having legalized cannabis for medical use, and the fact that the USA government has a patent on cannabis for it medical benefits.

The problems that I have with rescheduling cannabis is that in any other schedule than schedule I, big pharma gets control of the market.  Just like any other drug in Schedules II-V, Big Pharma controls and messes with that medicine however they see fit.

It also doesn’t offer much protection to consumers under Schedules II-V, because people still go to jail for these “legal drugs” for one thing or another.  Re-scheduling cannabis is not liberating cannabis. It is merely giving it a “medical qualification” and invalidating the claim that cannabis should be classified as schedule I.

While I disagree with Schedule I, I also disagree that big pharma should get control of this crop, because if they do, they will get their billions of dollars behind prohibition, and that can’t be good for anyone but big pharma.

Below is some of the issues that have taken place in Oregon.  Despite that cannabis has been rescheduled in Oregon, their dispensaries are getting shut down and patients are still getting arrested.

Rescheduling has not liberated Oregon from my point of view.

Which is why I believe it’s necessary to go back to May 18th 1969 when Timothy Leary challenged the constitutionality of cannabis prohibition and won.

Some clips from Oregon news on cannabis rescheduling:


Oregon Senate Bill 728 passed the Senate by a vote of 26-2, the House passed it 58-1, and the Senate concurred on amendments 26-3.  It now awaits Gov. Kulongoski’s signature.  The measure adds new sections to Oregon’s law on controlled substances:

—————

 

Portland — The Oregon State Board of Pharmacy acted today to remove marijuana from the list of “Schedule I Controlled Substances,” in accordance with a bill the legislature passed last year.

The new law, ORS 475.059 established by Senate Bill 728, requires marijuana’s removal from a list of controlled substances that have a “high abuse potential and no acceptable medical use in the United States.”

The Board placed marijuana into “Schedule II Controlled Substances,” which contains substances that have a “high abuse potential with severe psychological or physical dependence liability,” but are accepted for medical use in the US and are available by prescription. The Oregon Controlled Substances Act provides three additional schedules for substances that are progressively less serious or dangerous, Schedules III, IV and V.

The Board reviewed scientific and medical literature and heard testimony from experts and members of the public before voting to move marijuana into Schedule II. This action is consistent with Oregon’s assertion that marijuana does have an acceptable medical use.

——–

Portland — The Oregon State Board of Pharmacy acted today to remove marijuana from the list of “Schedule I Controlled Substances,” in accordance with a bill the legislature passed last year. The new law, ORS 475.059 established by Senate Bill 728, requires marijuana’s removal from a list of controlled substances that have a “high abuse potential and no acceptable medical use in the United States.” The Board placed marijuana into “Schedule II Controlled Substances,” which contains substances that have a “high abuse potential with severe psychological or physical dependence liability,” but are accepted for medical use in the US and are available by prescription. The Oregon Controlled Substances Act provides three additional schedules for substances that are progressively less serious or dangerous, Schedules III, IV and V. The Board reviewed scientific and medical literature and heard testimony from experts and members of the public before voting to move marijuana into Schedule II. This action is consistent with Oregon’s assertion that marijuana does have an acceptable medical use.

Senate Bill 728

http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measures/sb0700.dir/sb0728.en.html

 

http://stash.norml.org/wake-n-bake-lounge-raided-after-nearly-seven-months-of-openly-operating-in-aloha-4

On Wednesday June 16, 2011, officers in Washington County served search warrants on Wake n Bake Lounge, located at 18918 Shaw St in Aloha, Oregon.  Three residences associated with the cannabis club were also searched.  Although computers, various equipment and cannabis were confiscated during the execution of the warrant for suspected “manufacturing and distribution of a controlled substance,” no arrests were made.

How will this affect pot in Oregon? And what does this mean?

“A schedule I drug means that it has no medicinal value that is recognized,” said Lane County Chief Deputy District Attorney Patty Perlow. “A schedule II drug has recognized medicinal value but a high risk of abuse.
http://www.kval.com/news/local/96612724.html