Articles Tagged: decriminalization

Comparing Initiative 502 to the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

October 28th, 2012 | By Pirate

In this article I will explain how Washington’s Initiative 502 is similar to the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937.
There are differences, because we are now in a post Controlled Substances Act era, and this initiative is being touted as the initiative that will “legalize marihuana” (yes I spell cannabis as marihuana in this article similar to the way they did in 1937 for the marihuana tax act).
The similarities that I am noting have to do with the tax, and the proposal for a legal/regulated market.  The differences in the two are only related to the post 1970 Controlled Substances Act era.

My proposal in this article is that Initiative 502 is not legalization, it is just a clever way of retaining prohibition at a time when Hempfest is at its all time height of attendee’s, when a group with a shoe-string budget in Washington collected hundreds of thousands of signatures on a mostly volunteer basis to get cannabis legalized in Washington.
On March 18th 2012, sponsor of I-502 Pete Holmes said after a long speech about how he believe in decriminalization of marihuana, that “a people’s initiative (to legalize marihuana) scares him terribly“.

They (the prohibitionists and lawyer profiteers) realized that a people’s initiative passing was a reality and they fought desperately to thwart those efforts.  Pete Holmes, Alison Holcomb, the ACLU and many of the law enforcement officials all publicly denounced the efforts of thousands of volunteers to collect hundreds of thousands of signatures to legalize (remove the prohibitions) from marihuana laws in Washington.  (see  www.sensiblewashington.org)

At the end of my summary I will post the texts of the two law proposals (The Marihuana Tax Act 1937 and Initiative 502).  What’s also interesting to note, is that I-502 is far larger in size/text than the original prohibition proposal The 1937 Marihuana Tax Act.  I am just going to give links to the I-502 initiative because of its enormous size.

Lets start off with a few points.

  •  The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was not designed to create a market, despite what the text said.  Rather it was designed to create prohibition of cannabis.  See this article, the intro is a great description regarding how TMTA-1937 created prohibition:  http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/taxact/mjtaxact.htm
  • The title of the act, and the words in the act appeared to create a taxable and regulated market.  But after the act passed in 1937 very few stamps were issued.  During WWII many stamps were issued to fuel the war efforts.  But after WWII very few were ever issued again.

It is noted:

“Shortly after the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act went into effect on October 1, 1937, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Denver City police arrested Moses Baca for possession and Samuel Caldwell for dealing. Baca and Caldwell’s arrest made them the first marijuana convictions under U.S. federal law for not paying the marijuana tax.[19] Judge Foster Symes sentenced Baca to 18 months and Caldwell to four years in Leavenworth Penitentiary for violating the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act.”

If we compare this to Initiative 502, which is something touted by law enforcement and other sponsors as a way to reduce crime in the black market, and to create safer roads in Washington.

As described by the Secretary of State’s office, the measure would “license and regulate marijuana production, distribution, and possession for persons over twenty-one; remove state-law criminal and civil penalties for activities that it authorizes; tax marijuana sales; and earmark marijuana-related revenues.”

Here are the points being debated

  • State law currently requires a prosecutor to prove impairment in court for DUI, after I-502 impairment is not the measurement it is a rather un-scientific blood limit of THC (5nanograms of active THC).  This targets heavy users, specifically patients that are legally recommended by a doctor to use cannabis under Washington state laws
  • The excise taxes are extreme, 25% at each point of the market with local and state taxes on top of that equaling a rough 90% tax on cannabis, thus keeping it in the black market (even if the market was remotely possible under this proposal)
  • All to help alleviate the 10,000 or so possession arrests per year in Washington state.  When many of those arrests will happen anyway since the largest demographic of cannabis consumers are under the age of 21, and many of those arrests will happen anyway because a lot of those arrests are for over one ounce (the allowable limit).
  • The offset of these arrests are the potential for a lot more arrests via the provisions in Sec. 31., Page 46

My summary is.  The two of these law reform proposals have similar goals.  They both looked really good for the community before they were voted in, and were being proposed as something different than what the language contained in them defines.   We know now that the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was certainly the gateway to extreme marihuana prohibition.  But what about I-502.  I propose that this is also a gateway to more prohibition.  It does not at all in anyway say “legalization” to me.   In fact where I am in California anyone over the age of 18 can possess an ounce of marihuana without committing a crime, and there were no new and restrictive driving provisions installed when SB 1449 was passed, and there is no more mayhem on the roads than before.  There are over a dozen other states that have decriminalized in the same or similar ways.

I-502’s proposal for state liquor board regulated cannabis stores, and cooperation with the federal government including FBI fingerprints and background check for cannabis distributors is a sure sign that there will be no legal market, and this proposal for a ‘legal market’ will crash and burn just like SB 5073.

One more thing to note is that Washington has sufficient driving regulations to protect the roads against impaired driving.  Both DUI and Reckless Driving laws.
With Reckless driving the officer does not need to prove impairment, but only needs a visual observation that a person is driving Recklessly to issue penalties and possibly arrest.  The penalties of Reckless Driving rival and in some way are even stricter than DUI.

RCW 46.61.502: Driving under the influence

RCW 46.61.500: Reckless driving

There are also many other laws that work similarly such as

RCW 46.61.5249: Negligent driving

Washington didn’t need more restrictions on driving for this initiative to pass.  It just needed to be clear when educating about current laws regarding driving and cannabis.

More references:

Comparing Initiative 502 to the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

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The Russ Belville Show starts June 4th 2008

May 20th, 2012 | By Pirate

Recently the NORML Network was cancelled. Since then Russ has been regrouping to do the Russ Belville show.
In an article on his website dated May 19th 2012, Russ asks “What would you like to see in The Russ Belville Show?”.

I think about Russ’s career in politics and the evolution of what was built at the NORML stash/NORML Live show.

First I think of when Russ drummed in the Obama presidency and campaign for Barack Obama.
As if Russ couldn’t tell that Obama was an establishment politician? Well either he was ok with that, or he was naive about how Barack Obama would change.

When Russ was drumming in the Obama administration, I was asking Obama if he was going to be a liar, which I suspected that he would.

This is Russ’s speech about Barack Obama in October 2008.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_nXj-EZ5TE

This was my video addressing Barack Obama in December 2008.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DwGdwItpCE&feature=plcp

In Russ’s video he praises Barack Obama without hesitation.

In my video I point out how Barack Obama campaigns on a marijuana platform of decriminalization, and “leave patients alone” and such. He also chides his opponents for not being forthcoming and not keeping their promises. I point out that I did not support Barack Obama, but instead I supported Ralph Nader and that while I appreciate Barack Obama as president, I want to see him be forthright and honest (just like he insisted that Hillary Clinton do).

Well in the end Barack Obama lied. He didn’t keep his promises in the least, and laughed at any questions that came his way regarding cannabis.

For a few years Russ talked a good game, and worked diligently to unite the community and share essential information about cannabis.
Around the year 2010 that started to change, and we started seeing constant attacks on Roger Christie and other people with religious faith.
The division in the cannabis community became more pronounced with Proposition 19 and the name calling and infighting that was launched from the NORML camp.
Then with I-502, more of the same insults, and personal attacks on opponents.

Fast forward to a week ago when it was announced that Russ Belville would not be doing the NORML network anymore but instead would just be doing the 30 minute podcast.

Now Russ asks what people would like to see in the new Russ Belville show that will start up on June 4th 2012. This is his questionnaire:

http://radicalruss.com/?p=216#contact-form-216

This is my response to Russ via his contact form:

Name: Ryan Thompson
Email: info@xcannabis.com
What are your favorite parts of the show that should absolutely remain the same?: I love the in-depth facts about current cannabis news and legislation, I love the different voices and opinions on the topics as well.
What time would be best for you to catch the show live?: 5pm Pacific
The show will expand topics beyond just marijuana law reform, what do you think of that?: Excellent – marijuana reform is just one of many issues of personal freedom
If the show is going to be streaming in 720p HD, is that going to be a problem for your computer and bandwidth?: Maybe / I don’t know
What are your least favorite parts of the show that should be abolished immediately? (It’s just you and me – be honest, but constructive.): I don’t like the lack of objectivity when it comes to opposing points of view, for example to the infighting with the Prop19 opponents (I was a supporter of Prop19) and the disparaging words and rage against I-502 descenders (I am one of those). The facts are great. Presenting both sides is great. But the personal rage and slant on those topics make your show EXTREMELY hard to listen to, and in the past 18 months I have only listened to your show many 5 times. Where as before I listened to your show almost daily.
Anything else?: You are a smart guy, a professional broadcaster, and I am glad that you do what you do. Please be more respectful to religion, libertarian ideals, and people who disagree with you.

For further information about what I mean when I compared Chris Goldstein to Russ Belville. Chris Goldstein started the NORML Daily Audio Stash and later became a chapter president in New Jersey.
Chris Goldstein’s interview with Ron Paul in 2007 is what made me aware of NORML and had a lot to do with me becoming a supporter.

This is my video response to Russ’s questionnaire:

This is the interview that inspired me to become a supporter of NORML:
Ron Paul on NORML May 24th 2007

part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8t7jqis2Mc
part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZJSHYPkWbo

In the end I wish Russ the best. I won’t be sad to see several of the NORML Live guest hosts go.
I think that this will be a good change for NORML and for Russ.

Sensible Washington getting started early, how very SENSIBLE!!

July 18th, 2011 | By Pirate

Ok people if you believe in legalization, if you know the difference between “decriminalization” and “legalization”, if you are a patient in Washington that just had a bunch of your rights crapped on in Washington, most importantly if you want to see liberty in growing industrial hemp in Washington which will get part of this country off foreign oil, and will help preserve our environment, then listen up.  Sensible Washington is starting their funding drive for 2012.
You can donate at the Sensible Washington website as always:   http://sensiblewashington.org/blog/donate

I am not a part of Sensible Washington, just a fan.  But I believe between the given choices that already exist, Sensible Washington is the most SENSIBLE option in Washington.

This a little video that a made about it:

I wrote this blog post a few months ago:

http://xcannabis.com/2011/04/what-if-i-1149-fails-this-year/

Also learn more about running a successful citizens initiative via:

Citizens in Charge Foundation
2050 Old Bridge Road Suite 103
Lake Ridge, VA 22192
Phone: (703) 492-1776
Fax: (703) 910-7728
Email: info@citizensincharge.org
www.citizensincharge.org

Go Washington!

New Jersey fights for their medicine after waiting a year

March 11th, 2011 | By Pirate

The New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act  (more than a year later)

In a report from The Daily Targum on March 8th

A disturbing scene  unfolds as after even more than a year after the “New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act passed, patients in New Jersey still do not have medicine.   Because as congressional bills go, when they want to stump progress they just write an enormous amount of complications so that even if something does become unfavorable to them, they get MORE control be en-acting inane complications.

Get this, people have to grow their cannabis to a unfavorable quality in order to reduce THC to 10%.
And is that 10% by total weight of the plant, or just the buds?  Who tests it?
Plus something even more disturbing, that they expect sick and dying patients to drive many miles to a ‘Alternative Treatment Centers (ATC) ‘ one of only six available in the state.

“More than a year later, not a single patient has been able to legally access medical marijuana,” said Roseanne Scotti, N.J. director of the Drug Policy Alliance.

I have continued to reject these house bills, and I think all that they are used for in the case for medical marijuana or decriminalization of cannabis in general that they make these house bills to satisfy the popular opinion and pacify voters and to gain more control over the plant.

We are proud to know one of the activist, he even bought a Sensible Washington shirt despite that he lives in New Jersey.  I love his comment that was quoted.

A.J. Ballinger, an unemployed veteran who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, expressed his disapproval of the proposed regulations.

“I am done,” Ballinger said. “I cannot sit here and wait for you guys to figure out the most lucrative system to be put in place when you’re talking about my mental health, my family name.”

Please support true democracy.  Once again strengthen a government FOR THE PEOPLE BY THE PEOPLE.

I support the National Initiative for Democracy.    http://NI4D.us

http://vote.org

Here is another example of a very ‘helpful’ socialistic house bill:

California to legalize marijuana? Petition says it will be on the ballot.

January 31st, 2010 | By Pirate

I would be so absolutely grateful and humbled if California legalized marijuana!
I am so pessimistic about these things.  I fight, and I hope that freedom and liberty prevails!
For some reason it just seems to simple and too smart all at the same time.  It will confuse voters, because I feel like they expect something complex and full of a bunch of bullshit.

Legalize pot,

  • The police win; less non-violent criminals to have to deal with so they can focus on more serious crimes.
  • The parents win, because marijuana will be kept and sold in a secured and adult environment.(right now more teenagers smoke marijuana than smoke tobacco.  Same with alcohol and pot.)
  • Of course the tax payers win, because there is another great stream of jobs and tax money in a legal market.
    Instead of importing hemp from China, Australia and Canada we could produce and process it here.  That would create a lot of jobs.  Americans wear a lot of hemp these days, even though it’s more expensive than other fabrics.
  • Taking money away from the black market and infusing our community in a positive way would be good for everyone (except maybe the cartels and such)

We need to make sure that cannabis stays legal to grow under our current medical marijuana laws.  But I would love to see complete all out legalization of marijuana for adults.   As long as these adults are allowed to grow marijuana.
I support legislation that promotes these intelligent and sensible ideas that groups like NORML, MPP, and REASON are all promoting.

On the NORML Daily Audio Stash I heard a lot about how there are over 1 million children selling marijuana.
Legalization will run the black market out of business, just like with tobacco and alcohol.
Lower prices, ,more taxes and the community benefits from the taxes and has no need to spend billions criminalizing a harmless plant that has many medical benefits!


California proposes to legalize with TV Ad campaign and over 700,000 signatures from NORML:  http://slu2.com//00

This is from the Stranger:  http://slu2.com//z

Washington activists also filed an initiative that would legalize marijuana. But unlike California’s ringleader who “bankrolled a professional signature-gathering effort,” the campaign leaders in this state are planning an all-volunteer campaign and having a hard time even accepting online contributions.

While we have been doing business in point of sales, we have spoken with many banks.  Bank of America assured us that they would support our clients who run medical marijuana dispensaries!  
We have more information in the forums here at xCannabis.  Emerald POS has it’s own category.

::  Link Shortening Services from SLU2.com ::

Obama PLEASE stimulate the economy

January 27th, 2010 | By Pirate

My message to president Obama.

If you are not a puppet, and you have any intentions of keeping your promises. Then please stimulate the economy by keeping your promises about decriminalization and legalization. We spend too much on prohibition, and we are letting the cartels get rich off of the ‘drug war’ while tax payers do not see any benefits.
Remember prohibition from the 20s/30s. Legalization was good then too!

This is my video to President Obama from 2008.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DwGdwItpCE[/youtube]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DwGdwItpCE

This video is from a top economist/professor, Jeffery Miron:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcRMRuS-J-U

Prison Nation, putting people in jail for victimless crimes

June 21st, 2009 | By Pirate

Why is America a prison nation?

In the USA we have approximately 5% of the total world’s population.  Yet we have 25% of the total world’s prison population.
More than 80% of all of those in prison are serving time for non-violent offenses, which are mostly made up of drug offenses.

Our prohibition laws have been in place since 1937, and we are the most strict industrialized country in the world on drug prohibition, and yet our problem doesn’t get better it gets worse.  More people are using, and more people are addicted to drugs than in nearly all of the ‘free world’.

When we look at countries that have decriminalized, like Canada, Australia, Holland, etc..  These countries have less of a crime problem, less of an addiction problem, less users, etc..

Prohibition makes drugs taboo.   When people feel like they are being kept from something without justification it makes people want to use the prohibited activity more often it seems.

Here is a video that I made about how prohibition effected me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7n2bH5YPco

Law makers working on decriminalizing possession of marijuana

June 18th, 2009 | By Pirate

I try to keep up with major marijuana news, so I often visit NORML and CannabisCulture.

Right now a bi-partisan bill to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana by adults in being reintroduced:

From NORML:

“Washington, DC: Massachusetts Democrat Barney Frank, along with co-sponsors Ron Paul (R-TX); Maurice Hinchey (D-NY); Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA); and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), will reintroduce legislation today to limit the federal government’s authority to arrest and prosecute minor marijuana offenders.”

This bill would potentially save 860,000 lives being ruined each year for getting charged with possession of a victimless crime.
It would stand to end spending on enforcing penalties for a victimless crime, to the tune of 45 BILLION dollars per year.
It would also give room to let states tax and regulate marijuana, which would put it in a controlled liquor store type of environment, and create tax revenue that would potentially amount to 32 Billion dollars per year.

Write your congress reps and tell them to support this bill!  NORML makes it very easy to get this to your congress representatives by using the link below.  (Thanks NORML!)

http://capwiz.com/norml2/issues/alert/?alertid=13568661

See more at this video on HR 2835

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPLH-Q41PJA[/youtube]

Also see this video:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW-KvGe6XuI by Reverend Ryan

When a town in Utah does something very noble!

June 18th, 2009 | By Pirate

This is history by about 8 years now, but back in 2001 the little town of 400 people in Utah named “Big Water” passed an ordinance that decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana to a $10 fine (under 1 oz), and possession of paraphernalia a $5 fine.

The motive behind this says mayor Willie Marshall “Our ordinance made justice affordable for everybody,” said Marshall. “Let the punishment fit the crime.”

Under Utah law, possession of less than one ounce of marijuana is punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine, as well as a six-month drivers license suspension. Under state law, paraphernalia possession nets the same maximum six months and $1,000. According to a newspaper article about this situation that can be found at this link:  http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle-old/215/bigwater.shtml

I agree with Mayor Willie Marshall, and even though I think a $10 fine is too much for a victimless crime, I believe his intentions were in the right place, and I think you will find the city of Denver Colorado agrees, where it is legal (no fines) for adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana.

Ruining people’s life forever, putting a misdemeanor on their record which denies them the ability for scholarships, military service, working at certain jobs, etc..  for a victimless crime is insane.  A $1000 fine for possessing a plant that has never killed anyone in all of history?
This would be like making drinking from a drinking fountain a misdemeanor punishable with jail time and a $1000 fine.  Based on harm, and social impact, marijuana is no more of a threat than drinking water!

Bravo to this courageous mayor and this courageous city council.  It’s only too bad that these ordinances were later repealed, and that at least one officer is recorded and reprimended for threatening the city council members.

Utah Highway Patrol Officer Nathan Giles blew up at local officials, Marshall said, in an account whose broad contours were confirmed by regional Highway Patrol spokesman Lt. Lynn McAfee. “Once the police heard about this, they hit the ceiling, the Kane County sheriff and the Highway Patrol were just enraged,” said Marshall. “They do a lot of intimidating people into letting them search their cars. But Officer Nathan Giles was especially bent out of shape. He came in and yelled at the town clerk. ‘Who’s the dope-smoking son of a bitch who wrote this ordinance?’ Giles yelled. And then he made threats. ‘All hell is going to break loose in Big Water,’ he told her,” Marshall said.

Two weeks after the ordinance passed, UHP started harassing members of the entire town of Big Water:

On December 7, two weeks after the ordinance was passed, the town was hit with an “enforcement blitz” by Highway Patrol and Kane County Sheriff’s officers. “They were ticketing everyone for anything,” said Marshall. “They had a half dozen Highway Patrol cars out there pulling people over for no seat belt, failure to signal, anything they could think of.”

Which was confirmed by Lt. McAfee of the Utah Highway Patrol.

But this wasn’t the end of it, and as you guessed, this all has to do with police funding and getting revenue from these so-called crimes.

But Giles wasn’t done. “Then he went over to the water board office, where one of the council members works, while on-duty and in uniform and started arguing with her,” Marshall said, “telling her the ordinance was unconstitutional, that we had to repeal it, that the Highway Patrol could just stop writing tickets in our town, basically threatening to cut off a source of town funding. Not that we’re a speed trap,” Marshall quickly added. “Giles was very threatening and his behavior was very inappropriate.”


This is Utah life under a huge microscope in relation to the ‘drug war’.  No drug war equals no police funding.  It’s not about harm reduction, it’s about revenue!

This isn’t a war on drugs, this is a war on the American people!

Another Reference from a local newspaper:  http://archive.deseretnews.com/archive/880574/Big-Water-axes-controversial-laws.html

Freedom of Relgion, and freedom of religious sacrament

May 15th, 2009 | By Pirate

For many years now I have been a devout follower of the Lord Jesus Christ.  I have dedicated my time and resources to preach the gospel and to take my part in the Great Commission of Christ.  In 1999 I gave my life to Christ as a result of a unique, personal spiritual experience that I had while praying on the side of the road in Deer Park WA.  In 2001 I wrote my biography which was inspired by this spiritual awakening.   I was inspired to write a lot of poetry after that, and had it published on Poetry.com in hopes to inspire others.

I love to write and I love to inspire others.  But what I have enjoyed most is serving others.  After giving my life to Christ, I volunteered for a number of homeless ministries that I was once a regular client of while I was homeless.  I volunteered with these ministries because of how much people blessed me while I was homeless.  I wanted to inspired other clients of these ministries and show them the love that Christ and His church showed me.  I completed several trainings, and I served whenever I was able.  It has been a great blessing to me to be able to serve others.

In September of 2002, I spoke at a Southern Baptist convention about the loss of my brother, who lived in the most depressed state in the nation, Utah.   My brother’s death was a result of depression, and anti-depressant medication that he was prescribed, and I had a burden on my heart to try to reach those who were hurting, and who couldn’t speak out about it because of the fear of rejection by the Utah culture.  I wanted to be the mouth piece for those who couldn’t speak, like my 16 year old brother who lays in a grave in Spanish Fork Utah, completely voiceless now.

Now I have another burden on my heart, which is for the cannabis plant which I enjoy as a religious sacrament.  I feel that our freedom of religion in this country has been hijacked by the government and the DEA.  I believe that those of us who use cannabis as a sacrament as Moses and Jesus did in the days of old are persecuted unjustly and that our civil rights get violated when we are charged with crimes in relationship to our holy sacrament, cannabis.

Gensis 1:29

Gensis 1:29

I have heard it from religious folks and nonreligious folks that they do not believe cannabis was used by Biblical prophets.   They laugh at the thought of it.
But this is not uncommon, humanity has a knack for ignorance and I am no exception.  When I first gave my life to Christ, I gave up using cannabis for 7 years.

I had given up cannabis until I developed a vesicular anomaly that causes my sever headaches called cluster headaches that come on strong and fast, and that no prescription medicine has been able to relieve in anyway.  With these headaches I sometimes go blind, and I get a loud ringing in my ear.  It completely destroys my senses for about 30 minutes and the pain brings tears to my eyes.  One toke off a spliff instantly relieves this pain and this drastic symptoms, with no ill side-effects.

I tried Imitrex and Midrine before trying cannabis and all that those medicines did was make me feel ill and give me nose bleeds.
When this problem started we lived in Washington state which has passed many decriminalization measures for marijuana, and I tried some.   Instant relief as I described.  It was amazing, no nose bleeds, no stomach aches, no yucky feeling, nothing.  I just felt better, and happier.  The only real side effect that could be considered negative, was I felt hungry and got what people call “the munchies”.   I was sold, and start the process to get my medical marijuana card in Wa.

After that I started questioning whether this would conflict with my faith, and what I found was amazing.  Moses used cannabis in his anointing oil.  This is found in non-marijuana using Rabbi’s writings.  I have wrote about this several times before on this blog.

http://xcannabis.com/2008/09/cannabis-in-the-ancient-annointing-oil-moses-to-jesus/

Exodus 30:23 Fragrant Cane, or Cane of Bosom, or Sweet Cane is translated in several Hebrew Dictionaries as “Cannabis”.

See Roger Christy from the THC Ministry (Hawaii)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaiKSWKzjdc

I have also spoke about Jesus and His resistance to state and religious laws which forbid certain food and certain eating practices:

http://xcannabis.com/2008/09/cannabis-and-religion-2/

Now what I have found recently is quite amazing.

See this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xvf42scU2U

And read this about the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_Freedom_Restoration_Act

Our religious rights are protected!

The NJWeedman proved this when he practiced his religious sacrament on federal property in New Jersey.  He was arrested, he was man-handled, he weed was taken.  But the charges got over turned.  Not once, but 3 times!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaCw1j2RqxA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrGah9enZRQ

If you are a Christian, Jew or Hindu the use of cannabis your religion goes back thousands of years!

Ever wonder why Indians can use Peyote but no one else can?  Because it’s a religious sacrament.